Regulations

Noise-induced hearing loss has been called the most common permanent and preventable occupational injury. According to U.S. federal law, it is the responsibility of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration [OSHA] to regulate permissible noise exposure levels in the workplace. The OSHA CFR 1910.95 regulation requires employers first to utilize "engineering controls" to reduce noise levels in their work environments. Should these controls fail to reduce noise to acceptable limits, the regulation states that "personal protective equipment shall be provided and used to reduce sound levels."

Employers are also required to implement an "effective hearing conservation program" whenever employee noise exposure levels equal or exceed an 8-hour time-weighted average sound level (TWA) of 85 dB. As part of the conservation program, sound levels must be monitored and documented, and noise-exposed employees must receive annual training and audiometric testing, and be "fitted with hearing protectors, trained in their use and care, and required to use them."

Learn more about what you can do to implement a Hearing Conservation Program that puts people first from the information below.
Occupational Safety & Health Administration [OSHA] - Noise & Hearing Loss Prevention
OSHA CFR 1910.95

Organizations

Noise-induced hearing loss has been called the most common permanent and preventable occupational injury. According to U.S. federal law, it is the responsibility of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration [OSHA] to regulate permissible noise exposure levels in the workplace. The OSHA CFR 1910.95 regulation requires employers first to utilize "engineering controls" to reduce noise levels in their work environments. Should these controls fail to reduce noise to acceptable limits, the regulation states that "personal protective equipment shall be provided and used to reduce sound levels."

Employers are also required to implement an "effective hearing conservation program" whenever employee noise exposure levels equal or exceed an 8-hour time-weighted average sound level (TWA) of 85 dB. As part of the conservation program, sound levels must be monitored and documented, and noise-exposed employees must receive annual training and audiometric testing, and be "fitted with hearing protectors, trained in their use and care, and required to use them."

Learn more about what you can do to implement a Hearing Conservation Program that puts people first from the information below.
NIOSH - Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

Groups

Demonstrate to your team that hearing conservation is important at many levels – and not simply about complying with workplace regulations. In this section, you can download posters and flyers for your workplace and also access groups who offer resources to professionals, including audiologists, industrial hygienists, safety nurses, managers, students and other individuals involved in implementing hearing conservation programs.

American Academy of Audiology [AAA]
American Speech Language Hearing Association [ASHA]
Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation [CAOHC]
National Hearing Conservation Association [NHCA]

The following organizations may provide additional educational and outreach assistance for
a variety of hearing conservation and hearing loss prevention programs.

Hearing Foundation of Canada
House Ear Institute [HEI]
The EAR Foundation

Initiatives

 

HearForever™ is the Next Generation of Hearing Conservation.

www.hearforever.org

Intelligent Protection

 

Experience VeriPRO™ Field Verification Technology Online.

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Intelligent Hearing Protection and Communication System for enhanced listening, adaptive hearing protection

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